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Introducing The Bouvier des Flandres

The Bouvier des Flandres in Brief

The legacy of the Bouvier has produced many admirable qualities in this breed. He is a square, powerfully built dog, rugged and formidable in appearance. His harsh double coat protects him in all types of weather; his keen sense of smell and watchful gaze make him a most suitable farm dog. (He thrives on plenty of room to work and exercise, but he is not an "outdoor dog"; he must live with his loving people -- his "flock," his "pack".) He is agile, alert and intelligent, with character of great spirit and fearlessness; yet, he is serene in disposition, and has an even temperament.

Today, the Bouvier des Flandres acts as a farm dog, family friend, protector, shepherd, and guide dog for the blind or hearing impaired. His intelligence, sense of threat discrimination and keen scent qualifies many Bouviers to excel in police work, tracking and drug detection.

Owning a Bouvier, like many dogs, requires patience, love, a lot of grooming, a willingness to exercise the dog and pay for regular health care, a desire to have a companion who follows you around the house keeping an eye on you, and a commitment to complete at least one set of good obedience classes.

Taken from History of the Bouvier des Flandres - Origin: Belgium

 

Cross-Breeding Bouviers Position Statement

The American Bouvier des Flandres Club is dedicated to the health and welfare of the Bouvier des Flandres breed, and conserving the original breed function . . . that of a "farm dog, family friend, protector, shepherd, and guide dog for the blind or hearing impaired. His intelligence, sense of threat discrimination and keen scent qualifies many Bouviers to excel in police work, tracking and drug detection.” A purebred dog, in general, offers to his owner the likelihood that he will be a specific size, shape, color and temperament.

The predictability of a breed comes from the selection for traits that are desirable, and avoiding the traits that are undesirable. When a breed standard or type is set, the animals within that breed have less heterozygosity than do animals in a random population. The Flandoodle or Bouvadoodle (cross between a Bouvier and a Poodle) or a Bernouviers (cross between a Bouvier and a Bernese Mountain Dog (BMD) are nothing more than expensive mongrels. Because the genetic makeup is diverse from the Poodle or Bernese genes and the Bouvier genes, the resultant first generation (F1) offspring is a complete genetic gamble. The dog may be any size, color, coat texture and temperament. Indeed, the Poodle may not shed, but the BMD that maybe bred with the Bouvier do shed. Their coat may be wiry or silky and may mat (or tangle). Body shape varies with parentage, but can be lanky and narrow or over-sized. Behavior varies with the dog and within a litter. Some puppies may express poodle-like or Bernese-like attitudes and others somewhat may be like the Bouvier.

The American Bouvier des Flandres Club is opposed to cross-breeding of any pure-bred dogs, and is particularly opposed to the deliberate crossing of Bouvier des Flandres with any other breed. These crossbreds are a deliberate attempt to mislead the public with the idea that there is an advantage to these “designer” dogs. The crossbred dogs are prone to ALL the genetic disease(s) of both breeds, and offer none of the advantages that owning a purebred dog can offer.

The American Bouvier des Flandres Club wishes to thank Frances O. Smith DVM, PhD, an officer of the Labrador Retriever Club, Inc. and a Diplomate American College of Theriogenology, and the Golden Retriever Club of America for the use of portions of their statement on cross-breeding pure-bred dogs. It is hoped that the posting of this information will educate the public in the dangers, and clear fallacies, associated with the purchase of so-called “designer” dogs.

 

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